Tag Archives: work

Safe Act for Victims of Domestic Violence of Sexual Assault

On October 1, 2013, the “Safe Act” becomes effective.  The Safe Act provides 20 days of unpaid leave to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault.  The employer can require that this unpaid leave be covered under FMLA, New Jersey FMLA, vacation, or personal leave.

The purpose of the Safe Act is to provide New Jersey victims with time to deal with matters related to an incident of domestic abuse or sexual assault.  The Safe Act covers:

  1. The employee,
  2. The employee’s child,
  3. The employee’s parent,
  4. The employee’s spouse,
  5. The employee’s domestic partner, or
  6. The employee’s civil union partner.

Within 12 months of the incident, the Safe Act’s purpose is to provide the victim of domestic abuse or sexual assault can:

  • Seek medical attention for, or recover from, physical or psychological injuries;
  • Obtain servies from victim services organization;
  • Obtain psychological or other counseling;
  • Participate in safety planning, temporarily or permanent relocate, or undertake other actions to increase safety;
  • Seek legal assistance or remedies; or
  • Attend, participate in, or prepare for court proceedings.

If the employer violates the Safe Act, the employee can ask for the following remedies: (1) Reinstatement; (2) compensation for lost wages and benefits; (3) an injunction; (4) attorney’s fees and costs; (5) civil find of $1,000 to $2,000 for a first time violation; and (6) a fine of $5,000 for any subsequent violations.

via Labor Employment Law Blog: New Jersey Provides Unpaid Leave to Victims of Domestic Violence.

Leave a comment

Filed under civil rights, courts, discrimination, employment, ERISA, federal, fees, Pending Legislation, state, wage

Fifth Circuit Holds Lactation Discrimination is Unlawful Sex Discrimination

The E.E.O.C. (Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) issued a press release about an important decision coming from the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals.

In this decision, the court held that the company unlawfully discriminated against a female employee when they fired her.  In this case, the female employee was lactating or expressing milk.  The female employee asked her employer if she would be able to pump breast milk at work.  The company then fired the employee.

The court relied on the Title VII of Civil Rights Act, which was amended by the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1987.  The Pregnancy Discrimination Act provided that a company could not discriminate against a female worker on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition.

The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals dismissed the argument that “pregnancy-related conditions” ended on the day the mother gave birth.  In its decision, the court explained that lactation was a physiological condition distinct to women who have undergone a pregnancy.  In other words, women, not men, lactate or express milk.  Therefore, a company discriminates based on sex when it fires a woman for lactating.

via Fifth Circuit Holds Lactation Discrimination is Unlawful Sex Discrimination.

Leave a comment

Filed under civil rights, discrimination, employment, federal, legal decision

NLRB Clarifies Social Media Case Analysis

I mentioned this case before in a prior post.  Nevertheless, it warrants a follow up post dealing specifically with this case: Hispanic United of Buffalo.

In Hispanic United of Buffalo,the NLRB clarified the analysis for Facebook and other social media cases.

The facts are fairly typical for the increasing number of Facebook cases.  One employee had been complaining about the performance of co-workers and informed one of them that she was going to report her criticisms to the boss.  The co-worker posted a message on her Facebook page noting the criticism, saying she had “about had it,” and asking her fellow co-workers how they felt.  Four of them posted a defense of their work on the Facebook page, all while off-duty and on their own computers.  The employer fired all five for bullying the critical employee on Facebook.

All three Board members (Block, Griffin, and Hayes) agreed that the usual analysis for Section 8(a)(1) terminations–Meyers Industries–is applicable.  There wasn’t much discussion on this point, which is not surprising, as there is really nothing special about using social media other than it’s newer and cooler than more traditional forms of communication.  This essentially confirms what the General Counsel and many commentators (including yours truly) has been saying for a while, but it’s obviously a lot more helpful for the Board to make that clear.

via Workplace Prof Blog: NLRB Clarifies Social Media Case Analysis.

Leave a comment

Filed under labor, legal decision, NLRB, Privacy Rights, union

NLRB recent decisions

This is the list of the most recent and significant decisions decided by the NLRB:

Hispanics United of BuffaloThe Board found that the employer unlawfully fired five employees because of their Facebook posts and comments about a coworker who intended to complain to management about their work performance. In its analysis, the Board majority applied settled Board law to the new world of social media, finding that the Facebook conversation was concerted activity and was protected by the National Labor Relations Act. Member Hayes dissented.

Alan Ritchey, Inc. – In a unanimous decision that resolved the last of the two-member cases returned following the 2010 Supreme Court decision in New Process Steel, the Board found that where there is no collectively-bargained grievance-arbitration system in place, employers generally must give the union notice and an opportunity to bargain before imposing discipline such as a discharge or suspension on employees. Member Hayes was recused.

Latino Express In a decision that will affect most cases in which backpay is awarded, the Board decided to require respondents to compensate employees for any extra taxes they have to pay as a result of receiving the backpay in a lump sum. The Board will also require an employer ordered to pay back wages to file with the Social Security Administration a report allocating the back wages to the years in which they were or would have been earned. The Board requested briefs in this case in July 2012. Member Hayes did not participate in the case.

Chicago Mathematics & Science Academy – Rejecting the position of a teachers’ union, the Board found that it had jurisdiction over an Illinois non-profit corporation that operates a public charter school in Chicago. The non-profit was not the sort of government entity exempt from the National Labor Relations Act, the Board majority concluded, and there was no reason for the Board to decline jurisdiction. Member Hayes dissented in part.

United Nurses & Allied Professionals (Kent Hospital) – The Board, with Member Hayes dissenting, addressed several issues involving the rights of nonmember dues objectors under the Supreme Court’s Beck decision. On the main issue, the majority held that, like all other union expenses, lobbying expenses are chargeable to objectors, to the extent that they are germane to collective bargaining, contract administration, or grievance adjustment. The Board invited further briefing from interested parties on the how it should define and apply the germaneness standard in the context of lobbying activities.

WKYC-TV, Gannet Co. Applying the general rule against unilateral employer changes in terms and conditions of employment, the Board found that an employer’s obligation to collect union dues under a check-off agreement will continue after the contract expires and before a bargaining impasse occurs or a new contract is reached. Member Hayes dissented.

Leave a comment

Filed under labor, legal decision, NLRB, union

What NOT to include in your social media policy

HR.BLR has a good list to keep in mind when drafting your social media policy.  Please read this very carefully.

Social Media Policies: What NOT To Do

When creating your social media policies, here’s what NOT to do:

  • Don’t screen applicants on social media and/or ask for passwords to such sites. “Increasingly [such practices] will be prohibited by both federal and state law,” Scott explained. Additionally, screening on social media opens the risk for discrimination claims based on protected class status that may be discovered in social media postings.
  • “Don’t adopt social media policies which are overbroad, or which unreasonably chill the exercise of protected concerted activity rights under the NLRA.” Scott continued.
  • Don’t fire or discipline employees for social media content without first reviewing with counsel to ensure you are not crossing the line. Remember that the line is moving quickly as technology changes!
  • Don’t use third-party apps that are overbroad in their access to applicant and employee information.
  • Don’t refuse to hire applicants (or fire or discipline employees) based on information culled from social media without checking with experienced legal counsel.

Social Media Policies: What TO Do

Here are some “dos” for social media policies

  • Create a current, effective and enforceable social media policy.
  • Instruct employees not to use vulgar, obscene, threatening, intimidating or harassing language; attack people based on protected status (e.g., union status or activity, disability, national origin, etc.); disparage company products and services; or disclose confidential or proprietary company information.
  • Create a companion privacy policy, establishing guidelines to prevent the disclosure of confidential employee or company information. Confidential employee information may include things such as home addresses, birthdays, employee personal data (including medical data), and protected status information. Company proprietary information could be financial, trade secrets, or other business information deemed confidential. (These lists contain examples, but are not comprehensive.)
  • Train employees about social media policies.
  • “Use a non-decision-maker to filter the contents of the social media page” if you do use social media as part of applicant screening, Semler advised. This is so you don’t get charged with the knowledge of protected status.
  • Monitor ongoing legal developments and conform your practices to those changes. For example, monitor the constantly changing laws, regulations and rules established and implemented by federal and state legislatures, agencies and courts.

via What NOT to include in your social media policy.

Leave a comment

Filed under electronic discovery, Privacy Rights

NLRB launches webpage describing Protected Concerted Activity | NLRB

The National Labor Relations Board today made public a webpage that describes the rights of employees to act together for their mutual aid and protection, even if they are not in a union.

The page, at http://www.nlrb.gov/concerted-activity, tells the stories of more than a dozen recent cases involving protected concerted activity, which can be viewed by clicking points on a map. Among the cases: A construction crew fired after refusing to work in the rain near exposed electrical wires; a customer service representative who lost her job after discussing her wages with a coworker; an engineer at a vegetable packing plant fired after reporting safety concerns affecting other employees; a paramedic fired after posting work-related grievances on Facebook; and poultry workers fired after discussing their grievances with a newspaper reporter.

Some cases were quickly settled after charges were filed, while others progressed to a Board decision or to federal appellate courts. They were selected to show a variety of situations, but they have in common a finding at some point in the NLRB process that the activity that the employees undertook was protected under federal labor law.

The right to engage in certain types of concerted activity was written into the original 1935 National Labor Relations Act’s Section 7, which states that:  “Employees shall have the right to self-organization, to form, join, or assist labor organizations, to bargain collectively through representatives of their own choosing, and to engage in other concerted activities for the purpose of collective bargaining or other mutual aid or protection, and shall also have the right to refrain from any or all such activities.”

That right has been upheld in numerous decisions by appellate courts and by the U.S. Supreme Court over the years. Non-union concerted activity accounts for more than 5% of the agency’s recent caseload.

via NLRB launches webpage describing Protected Concerted Activity | NLRB.

Leave a comment

Filed under labor, NLRB

Midlevel Associate Satisfaction Drops

Midlevel law firm associates billed an average of 2,037 hours last year, a finding that likely explains a drop in their satisfaction levels.

According to an American Lawyer survey, midlevel associate satisfaction has dropped to its lowest level since 2004. One DLA Piper associate responding to the survey of third-, fourth- and fifth-year associates made the connection. “Firms got too lean [after the recession] and consequently realized that associates will work more and more if asked,” the associate wrote. “Quality of life has therefore decreased.”

On the bright side, compensation is up, the story says. The average base salary for midlevel associates this year is $185,319, a 4 percent increase. The average average year-end bonus is $19,746, up 5 percent.

via Billable Hours Rise and Midlevel Associate Satisfaction Drops – News – ABA Journal.

Leave a comment

Filed under attorneys