What NOT to include in your social media policy

HR.BLR has a good list to keep in mind when drafting your social media policy.  Please read this very carefully.

Social Media Policies: What NOT To Do

When creating your social media policies, here’s what NOT to do:

  • Don’t screen applicants on social media and/or ask for passwords to such sites. “Increasingly [such practices] will be prohibited by both federal and state law,” Scott explained. Additionally, screening on social media opens the risk for discrimination claims based on protected class status that may be discovered in social media postings.
  • “Don’t adopt social media policies which are overbroad, or which unreasonably chill the exercise of protected concerted activity rights under the NLRA.” Scott continued.
  • Don’t fire or discipline employees for social media content without first reviewing with counsel to ensure you are not crossing the line. Remember that the line is moving quickly as technology changes!
  • Don’t use third-party apps that are overbroad in their access to applicant and employee information.
  • Don’t refuse to hire applicants (or fire or discipline employees) based on information culled from social media without checking with experienced legal counsel.

Social Media Policies: What TO Do

Here are some “dos” for social media policies

  • Create a current, effective and enforceable social media policy.
  • Instruct employees not to use vulgar, obscene, threatening, intimidating or harassing language; attack people based on protected status (e.g., union status or activity, disability, national origin, etc.); disparage company products and services; or disclose confidential or proprietary company information.
  • Create a companion privacy policy, establishing guidelines to prevent the disclosure of confidential employee or company information. Confidential employee information may include things such as home addresses, birthdays, employee personal data (including medical data), and protected status information. Company proprietary information could be financial, trade secrets, or other business information deemed confidential. (These lists contain examples, but are not comprehensive.)
  • Train employees about social media policies.
  • “Use a non-decision-maker to filter the contents of the social media page” if you do use social media as part of applicant screening, Semler advised. This is so you don’t get charged with the knowledge of protected status.
  • Monitor ongoing legal developments and conform your practices to those changes. For example, monitor the constantly changing laws, regulations and rules established and implemented by federal and state legislatures, agencies and courts.

via What NOT to include in your social media policy.

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