Monthly Archives: April 2015

Follow up on Arpaio: Yes, I did it but it wasn’t my fault

Sheriff Arpaio has been on the news multiple times for his harsh tactics and opinion on immigration.  I came across this interesting article in Courthouse News, where Arpaio admitted that he violated the law and then shifted all of the blame to his attorney and the people under him for following his orders.

Article on the preliminary injunction that the Court ordered.

Article on Arpaio being brought on contempt charges.

via Courthouse News Service.

Leave a comment

Filed under civil rights, discrmination, immigration

Obama Vetoes rule that would have negative impact on union elections

President Barack Obama vetoed a measure passed by the Republican-led Congress that would have stopped the National Labor Relations Board from streamlining the process of unionizing workers.

The new rules, drafted by the NLRB last year would, shorten the amount of time between when a union election is called and when it is held to as little as 14 days.

They also require employers to supply union organizers with workers’ email addresses and telephone numbers, and delay legal challenges by employers until after workers have voted on a proposal to unionize.

They are now set to take effect on April 14.

Earlier this month, Republicans in the House and Senate approved a bill that would have stopped their enactment.

But on Tuesday, Obama vetoed the measure, while stating that he say the NLRB’s approach as “modest” and a reflection of “common sense.”

“”Unions have played a vital role in giving workers that voice, allowing workers to organize together for higher wages, better working conditions, and the benefits and protections that most workers take for granted today.,” the president said. ” Workers deserve a level playing field that lets them freely choose to make their voices heard, and this requires fair and streamlined procedures for determining whether to have unions as their bargaining representative..”

” Because this resolution seeks to undermine a streamlined democratic process that allows American workers to freely choose to make their voices heard, I cannot support it,” Obama added.

via Courthouse News Service.

Leave a comment

Filed under civil rights, federal, labor, NLRA, NLRB, union

House Bipartisan Bill – Medicare Access and CHIP

A bipartisan bill, H.R. 2, Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization ACT, would repeal the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) formula, which sets a cap on physician spending, and would revamp payment of physicians under Medicare. On March 26, 2015 the U.S. House overwhelmingly (392-37) voted in favor of the bill, also known as SGR replacement bill. The Senate will vote on the bill after recess.

The legislation was introduced by Speaker John Boehner (R, Ohio) and Minority Leader, Nancy Pelosi (D, California). It would repeal the SGR Medicare formula that imposes the imminent threat of cuts to Medicare providers and would eliminate the need for Congress to set payment rates for Medicare physicians annually – a process known as “doc fix”. Since 2003, Congress has overridden the cuts imposed by SGR on 17 occasions, and the most recent override ends on March 31, 2015. If Congress does not take action, Medicare payments to physicians will be cut by 21% on April 1, 2015.

The H.R. Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization ACT will

  • Repeal the Sustainable Growth Rate Formula;
  • Ensure a 5-year period of annual increases of 0.5% in payments to physicians;
  • Set up a two-tier payment system that incentivizes a shift to value-based payment systems that reward physicians who meet performance thresholds and make care-coordination efforts for patients with chronic conditions;
  • Incentivize transition to alternative payment models (APMs) by requiring that physicians receive at least 25% of their revenue through an APM in 2018-2019, with an increased threshold overtime; and
  • Extend funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and community health centers for another two years.

These changes are estimated to cost approximately $200 billion, and $70 billion of that cost would be offset by two major program changes: (1) higher premiums for higher-income Medicare beneficiaries and (2) reduced governmental spending on supplemental insurance plans, increasing out-of-pocket costs for Medigap recipients.

via Legislation Law Prof Blog.

Leave a comment

Filed under federal