Category Archives: Law Schools

Law Schools Cuts

The ABA Journal reporting on an interesting trend.  Law Schools are trying to deal with the current economic situation and the decline of law school applicants.

The Wall Street Journal  (subscription required) reports that LSAC’s (Law School Admission Council) most recent data shows that as of July 5th, applications for the entering class of 2013 fell by 36% compared to the entering class in 2010.

These faculty cuts are noted in the article:

  • Hamline University School of Law in St. Paul, Minn., has cut full-time faculty about 18 percent since 2010. Fourteen faculty members have left or plan to leave after accepting early retirement incentives.
  • Eight professors at Vermont Law School have agreed to retire early, take pay cuts or give up tenure.
  • Twenty-one professors accepted buyout packages at Widener University School of Law in Wilmington, Del., and Harrisburg, Pa.
  • Seven professors accepted early retirement packages from the University of Dayton School of Law.
  • Seven untenured professors at Seton Hall University School of Law in Newark, N.J., have received notice that their contracts might not be renewed for the 2014-15 academic year.
  • The University of the Pacifics McGeorge School of Law in Sacramento, Calif., is accelerating plans to cut the size of the law school and use some of its campus for other graduate-level classes.

via Law schools cope with declining enrollment by quietly cutting faculty – ABA Journal.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Law Schools, Minnesota

Admission to the MN Bar changes

On January 17, 2013, the Minnesota Supreme Court has affirmed changes to the admission to the Bar.  The amendments that changed the Rules of Admission are:

Definitions:  Rule 2A(12) definition of Uniform Bar Examination.  Under the new amendment, UBE is “an examination prepared by the National Conference of Bar Examiners (NCBE), comprised of six Multistate Essay Examination questions, two Multistate Performance Test questions, and the Multistate Bar Examination.  See amendments to Rule 7C (Admission by UBE score).

Requirements for Admission:  Rule 4A(4) was amended to state that an eligible applicant must provide satisfactory evidence of a passing score on the written examination under Rule 6 and is not eligible for admission under Rules 7A (Eligibility by Practice), 7B (Eligibility by MBE), 7C (Eligibility by UBE), 8, 9, or 10.

Requirements for Admission:  Rule4B was stricken.  Rule4B previously stated that the applicant had to be a resident of Minnesota or maintain an office in Minnesota or designate the Clerk of Appellate Courts as agent for service of process for all purposes.

The Examination:  Rule 6E(1) Essay Questions was amended to delete the following subjects:

  1. Civil Procedure (but note that the amendment added a Federal Civil Procedure subject);
  2. Ethics and Professional Responsibility;
  3. Federal Individual Income Taxation;
  4. Uniform Commercial Code Art. 1 &2 (but note that under the Contracts subject, the amendments include the UCC; as well as the new subject of Negotiable Instruments); and
  5. Wills, Estates and Trusts (but note that there is a new subject of Trusts and Estates).

The Examination:  Rule 6E(1) Essay Questions added the following subjects:

  1. Conflict of Laws;
  2. Federal Civil Procedure;
  3. Negotiable Instruments (Commercial Paper) under the UCC;
  4. Secured Transactions under the UCC; and
  5. Trusts and Estates.

The Examination:  Rule 6E(1) Essay Questions further stated what topics where covered under the following subjects:

  1. Business Associations – the subject no longer includes proprietorships;
  2. Contracts – the amendment stated the subject includes contracts under the UCC; and
  3. Trusts and Estates – the subject includes Decedents’ Estates, and Trusts and Future Interests

The Examination: Rule 6E(2) Multistate Performance Test stated there will be two 90-minute questions.  The prior rule stated one or two.

Admission Without Examination:  Rule 7A(C) Eligibility by UBE score was added to the ways an applicant may be admitted.  Rule 7A(C) states that the applicant might have received a certified scaled score of 260 or higher.  Rule 7A(C) also states the application must be completed within 36 months of the date of the examination.

Admission Without Examination:  Rule 7A(D) Transfer of MBE or UBE score was amended to add UBE.

Confidentiality and Release of Information:  Rule 14C(4) Examination of Data now includes the disclosure of the UBE.  In addition Rule 14C(5) specifies that the director may release copies of unsuccessful examinee’s answers to MEE and MPT questions.

via STATE OF MINNESOTA. (published by Minnesota Lawyer – subscription required).

Leave a comment

Filed under Law Schools, law students, Minnesota, rules

NY Is First State to Require Law Students to Do Pro Bono Work to Get Licensed After Graduation

This is an article from the ABA News website:

In a move that is expected to improve access to the civil justice system for low-income individuals, Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman announced at a press conference Wednesday a new Court of Appeals rule requiring all law graduates to complete 50 hours of pro bono work before they will be admitted to practice in New York.

It is expected that many will complete the pro bono requirement while they are still law students, according to Reuters. However, the pro bono requirement can also be met after an individual earns his or her law degree.

The pro bono requirement doesn’t take effect until Jan. 1, 2015, so it does not apply to current third-year law students.

What qualifies as pro bono work is broadly defined, the article notes, alleviating concerns by law school deans that the program would be difficult to administer.

A 15-member advisory committee that helped draft the new pro bono rule will also oversee its implementation and evaluate how well it works, the news agency notes.

The New York Law Journal (reg. req.) provides a link to a copy of the new pro bono rule (PDF).

via NY Is First State to Require Law Students to Do Pro Bono Work to Get Licensed After Graduation – News – ABA Journal.

Leave a comment

Filed under attorneys, Law Schools, law students, rules

ABA sanctions law school for false data

Yesterday, the ABA issued sanctions against the University of Illinois College of Law for intentionally reporting and publishing false admissions data.  Specifically, false LSAT scores and incoming student GPA data for the entering classes of 2005, and 2007 to 2011.

The sanctions imposed by the ABA were as follows:

  • Public censure, which must be posted prominently on the home page of the University of Illinois College of Law’s website for a period of 2 years,
  • The requirement that the University of Illinois College of Law issue a public corrective statement to be distributed to all ABA-approved law schools,
  • The requirement that the law school hire a compliance monitor for a period of no less than 2 years,
  • Monetary penalty of $250,000 to be paid by Sept. 15, 2012, and
  • The termination of a section agreement that allowed the law school to conduct an early-admissions program.

 

via ABA Legal Education Section Announces Sanctions Against University of Illinois College of Law – ABANow – ABA Media Relations & Communication Services.

Leave a comment

Filed under Law Schools, law students, sanctions

Yale Launches New Law PhD Program Aimed at Those with JD Degrees Who Want to Teach

As reported by ABA Journal News:

Amidst a competitive market for those entering legal academia and an expectation that even entry-level law professors will have significant scholarly credentials, Yale Law School has announced a new PhD degree program.

Geared toward those who have already earned a juris doctor degree from an American law school and want to work as a law professor, the new program is billed as the first of its kind in the U.S. in a law school press release Wednesday. It points out that Yale, despite a relatively small student body, educated about 10 percent of the countrys law professors, including eight of the deans at what many consider the nations top 10 law schools.

“In the past few decades, legal scholarship has matured as an academic discipline,” says Dean Robert Post in the release. “Because the level of the scholarship expected of entry-level law professors has risen quite dramatically, increasing numbers of law professors now pursue PhDs in allied disciplines like economics, history, philosophy, or political science. Because such disciplines train students in standards and questions that are different from those of the law, the natural next step for the legal academy is to create our own PhD program that can focus on the questions and practices of the law itself. Students obtaining a PhD in law may, of course, engage in interdisciplinary studies, but their work will be anchored in the framework of legal scholarship.”

The law PhD program will begin accepting applications in the fall of 2012 and start enrolling students in the fall of 2013. Students will be eligible for a tuition waiver and a living expenses stipend.

via Yale Launches New Law PhD Program Aimed at Those with JD Degrees Who Want to Teach – News – ABA Journal.

Leave a comment

Filed under attorneys, Law Schools

U of MN considers leaving public funding behind

Minnesota Lawyer Blog had an interesting entry explaining the predicament that many public-funded organizations face: a decline in public funding.

The Universityof Minnesota Law School is considering abandoning public funding, and focusing on private funding.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Law Schools

Law School Rankings

ABA reports:

U.S. News & World Report will probably change its law school ranking methodology to reflect the new and more detailed job placement information the ABA’s law school accrediting arm has conditionally agreed to start collecting.

Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under Law Schools

U of M law school gets no state funding

U of M law school ready to go it alone

Patrick Thornton over at Minnesota Lawyer Blog reports:

The administration at the University of Minnesota Law School is preparing for some bad news when a state budget is finalized: No state funding. None. Zero.

Approximately 12 percent of the law school’s funding, just over $5 million of its $42 million budget, came from the state last budget cycle.

School officials are preparing to be self sufficient soon.To offset the state money, the school is in the midst of an aggressive fundraising campaign. The school hopes to raise $30 million with much of the money going to scholarships for needy students.

The drive is chaired by Twin Cities attorney Bruce Mooty, one of the founding partners of Gray Plant Mooty and a law school graduate.

via U of M law school ready to go it alone – MinnLawyer Blog.

Leave a comment

Filed under Law Schools