Tag Archives: applicant

EEOC’s First GINA Suit Settlement

The first settlement between the EEOC and an employer over GINA is important because it brings attention to this relatively new law.  EEOC charges alleging GINA violations have increased each year.  Consequently, it is important for employers to ensure their policies and procedures are compliant with GINA procedures.

The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) went into effect in 2009.  Some of GINA’s regulations are as follows.

  • It is illegal for employers to discriminate against employees or applicants based on their genetic information.
  • Employers cannot request or obtain genetic information, which includes any information about an employee or an applicant’s family history.
  • GINA also applies to third parties.  So, employers cannot request or obtain family medical history, even through a third-party medical provider or examiner.
  • There are exceptions for voluntary health risk assessments.  However, if the employee is receiving an incentive for completion of the Health Risk Assessment, the employer must make clear that an employee need not answer any of the questions about family medical history in order to obtain the incentive.

On May 7, 2013, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) reached a milestone of sorts as it filed – and then settled – its first complaint ever alleging genetic discrimination under the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (“GINA”).

The EEOC filed suit in Oklahoma federal court against Fabricut Inc., one of the world’s largest distributors of decorative fabrics, alleging that Fabricut violated GINA and the Americans With Disabilities Act (“ADA”) by unlawfully asking a job applicant for her family medical history in a pre-employment, post-job offer medical examination, and allegedly rescinding her job offer based on the belief that she had carpal tunnel syndrome.

The EEOC and Fabricut reached a settlement, which is the first settlement in a GINA case.  In the consent decree, Fabricut agreed to pay $50,000 but did not admit to violating GINA or the ADA.

via EEOC’s First GINA Suit Serves As Reminder of Pre-Employment Exam Pitfall | Proskauer Rose LLP – JDSupra.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under civil rights, discrimination, employment, federal, regulations, rules

Giving up your password when looking for a job?

Should your potential employer require you to give up your password to Twitter? Facebook? LinkedIn? Will your comments, background information, age, nationality, pictures be used against you?

What if the employer does not use that information, but still has access to it?  Would that raise a concern that it was in fact used against a job applicant?  Allowing the requirement of social media passwords bring potential liability issues to employers.

Minnesota Lawyer (subscription required) has a very interesting article.   The Minnesota proposed bill, introduced by Rep. Mary Franson (R-Alexandria) seeks to ban employers from asking job applicants for their social media passwords as part of the job interview.  It is important to note, as stated by the article, that the bill does not discuss already hired employees and the use of employer laptops, computers, smartphones, etc.

Pending legislation in Minnesota includes H.F. 293, H.F. 611, S.F. 484, and S.F. 596.  All of these bills seek to ban employers fro requiring social network passwords as a condition of employment.

The National Conference of State Legislation reports that there are at least 29 states with introduced or pending legislation seeking to ban employers from requiring/asking for these social media passwords.

Leave a comment

Filed under civil rights, discovery, electronic discovery, Minnesota, Pending Legislation, Privacy Rights

New Mortgage Loan Regulations

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau issued two regulations that expand the types of mortgage loans subject to federal protections and require creditors to provide loan applicants with written appraisals.  You can access the regulations here.

One of the regulations expands the types of mortgage loans subject to the protections of the Home Ownership and Equity Protections Act HOEPA, which was enacted to address abusive refinancing practices and equity loans with high interest rates or high fees.  HOEPA was amended through the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act to add protections for high-cost mortgages.

Among the changes, the regulation requires borrowers to receive home ownership counseling before obtaining a high-cost mortgage.

The regulation also adds exemptions for three types of loans the CFPB does not believe are as risky: loans to finance initial construction of a house, loans originated and financed by housing finance agencies, and loans from the U.S. Department of Agricultures Rural Housing Service loan program.

The CFPB also issued a rule that would require creditors to provide applicants with free copies of all appraisals and other written valuations and requiring creditors to notify applicants in writing.

The rule is consistent with an amendment to the Equal Credit Opportunity Act. Previously, creditors only had to provide copies of appraisals when applicants requested them.

Creditors are prohibited from charging applicants for copies of appraisals, but may charge for appraisals and other written valuations.

Both rules become effective January 18, 2014.

via Courthouse News Service.

Leave a comment

Filed under civil rights, regulations

New Md. Law May Be First in Country Banning Employers From Seeking Workers’ Social Media Passwords

In what could be the first such law in the country, Maryland has enacted a bill that would prohibit employers from demanding personal passwords to social media sites such as Facebook from job applicants and workers.

State lawmakers last week almost unanimously approved making such information private, in response to reports that a growing number of employers are seeking access to individuals’ personal social media accounts to gather information for job-related decision-making, Raycom News Network reports.

The bill will take effect as law after it is signed into law by the state governor, the Gazette reports.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland favored the new measure. The state Chamber of Commerce opposed it.

While no one wants others to read private messages, the chamber had hoped lawmakers would recognize that there may be legitimate reason for employers to review social media sites, said lawyer and employment practitioner Elizabeth Torphy-Donzella of Shawe Rosenthal. Her Baltimore-based law firm represents the chamber.

Similar legislation is being pursued in California and Illinois and in Congress, the Baltimore Sun reports.

The Washington Post’s Capitol Business Blog says Michigan also is considering such a law.

via New Md. Law May Be First in Country Banning Employers From Seeking Workers’ Social Media Passwords – News – ABA Journal.

Leave a comment

Filed under civil rights, employment

Facebook and Job Applicants

Federal law clearly provides that employers must not discriminate against job applicants based on a number of factors, pursuant to Title VII, the ADA and ADAAA. What might employers find when they ask job applicants for their Facebook password?  Potentially sensitive information that could be used in a prohibitive manner when deciding who to hire – such as information regarding disabilities.

The following article was uploaded at EDD Blog:

Friday, Facebook threatened legal action against companies who require applicants provide usernames and passwords so prospective employers can see what applicants and their friends post on social networks. Now, it’s not clear what legal recourse Facebook has if businesses refuse to obey their demands, but shutting down the business’s Fan Page appears likely for violators. This action could cost firms tens of thousands or millions of dollars.

Erin Egan, Facebook’s Chief Privacy Officer had this to say about employers asking for applicant’s passwords:

“If you are a Facebook user, you should never have to share your password, let anyone access your account or do anything that might jeopardize the security of your account or violate the privacy of your friends,” Egan wrote. “We don’t think employers should be asking prospective employees to provide their passwords because we don’t think it’s the right thing to do.”

Facebook’s stance highlights the changing climate which causes clashes between individual privacy rights and corporate protection. And, without a strong social media policy, firms not only face possible legal action, but lose what is becoming a mandatory marketing channel.

via edd blog online: You Need A Social Media Policy.

Leave a comment

Filed under civil rights, electronic discovery