Tag Archives: application

Law Schools Cuts

The ABA Journal reporting on an interesting trend.  Law Schools are trying to deal with the current economic situation and the decline of law school applicants.

The Wall Street Journal  (subscription required) reports that LSAC’s (Law School Admission Council) most recent data shows that as of July 5th, applications for the entering class of 2013 fell by 36% compared to the entering class in 2010.

These faculty cuts are noted in the article:

  • Hamline University School of Law in St. Paul, Minn., has cut full-time faculty about 18 percent since 2010. Fourteen faculty members have left or plan to leave after accepting early retirement incentives.
  • Eight professors at Vermont Law School have agreed to retire early, take pay cuts or give up tenure.
  • Twenty-one professors accepted buyout packages at Widener University School of Law in Wilmington, Del., and Harrisburg, Pa.
  • Seven professors accepted early retirement packages from the University of Dayton School of Law.
  • Seven untenured professors at Seton Hall University School of Law in Newark, N.J., have received notice that their contracts might not be renewed for the 2014-15 academic year.
  • The University of the Pacifics McGeorge School of Law in Sacramento, Calif., is accelerating plans to cut the size of the law school and use some of its campus for other graduate-level classes.

via Law schools cope with declining enrollment by quietly cutting faculty – ABA Journal.

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EEOC’s First GINA Suit Settlement

The first settlement between the EEOC and an employer over GINA is important because it brings attention to this relatively new law.  EEOC charges alleging GINA violations have increased each year.  Consequently, it is important for employers to ensure their policies and procedures are compliant with GINA procedures.

The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) went into effect in 2009.  Some of GINA’s regulations are as follows.

  • It is illegal for employers to discriminate against employees or applicants based on their genetic information.
  • Employers cannot request or obtain genetic information, which includes any information about an employee or an applicant’s family history.
  • GINA also applies to third parties.  So, employers cannot request or obtain family medical history, even through a third-party medical provider or examiner.
  • There are exceptions for voluntary health risk assessments.  However, if the employee is receiving an incentive for completion of the Health Risk Assessment, the employer must make clear that an employee need not answer any of the questions about family medical history in order to obtain the incentive.

On May 7, 2013, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) reached a milestone of sorts as it filed – and then settled – its first complaint ever alleging genetic discrimination under the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (“GINA”).

The EEOC filed suit in Oklahoma federal court against Fabricut Inc., one of the world’s largest distributors of decorative fabrics, alleging that Fabricut violated GINA and the Americans With Disabilities Act (“ADA”) by unlawfully asking a job applicant for her family medical history in a pre-employment, post-job offer medical examination, and allegedly rescinding her job offer based on the belief that she had carpal tunnel syndrome.

The EEOC and Fabricut reached a settlement, which is the first settlement in a GINA case.  In the consent decree, Fabricut agreed to pay $50,000 but did not admit to violating GINA or the ADA.

via EEOC’s First GINA Suit Serves As Reminder of Pre-Employment Exam Pitfall | Proskauer Rose LLP – JDSupra.

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Giving up your password when looking for a job?

Should your potential employer require you to give up your password to Twitter? Facebook? LinkedIn? Will your comments, background information, age, nationality, pictures be used against you?

What if the employer does not use that information, but still has access to it?  Would that raise a concern that it was in fact used against a job applicant?  Allowing the requirement of social media passwords bring potential liability issues to employers.

Minnesota Lawyer (subscription required) has a very interesting article.   The Minnesota proposed bill, introduced by Rep. Mary Franson (R-Alexandria) seeks to ban employers from asking job applicants for their social media passwords as part of the job interview.  It is important to note, as stated by the article, that the bill does not discuss already hired employees and the use of employer laptops, computers, smartphones, etc.

Pending legislation in Minnesota includes H.F. 293, H.F. 611, S.F. 484, and S.F. 596.  All of these bills seek to ban employers fro requiring social network passwords as a condition of employment.

The National Conference of State Legislation reports that there are at least 29 states with introduced or pending legislation seeking to ban employers from requiring/asking for these social media passwords.

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Admission to the MN Bar changes

On January 17, 2013, the Minnesota Supreme Court has affirmed changes to the admission to the Bar.  The amendments that changed the Rules of Admission are:

Definitions:  Rule 2A(12) definition of Uniform Bar Examination.  Under the new amendment, UBE is “an examination prepared by the National Conference of Bar Examiners (NCBE), comprised of six Multistate Essay Examination questions, two Multistate Performance Test questions, and the Multistate Bar Examination.  See amendments to Rule 7C (Admission by UBE score).

Requirements for Admission:  Rule 4A(4) was amended to state that an eligible applicant must provide satisfactory evidence of a passing score on the written examination under Rule 6 and is not eligible for admission under Rules 7A (Eligibility by Practice), 7B (Eligibility by MBE), 7C (Eligibility by UBE), 8, 9, or 10.

Requirements for Admission:  Rule4B was stricken.  Rule4B previously stated that the applicant had to be a resident of Minnesota or maintain an office in Minnesota or designate the Clerk of Appellate Courts as agent for service of process for all purposes.

The Examination:  Rule 6E(1) Essay Questions was amended to delete the following subjects:

  1. Civil Procedure (but note that the amendment added a Federal Civil Procedure subject);
  2. Ethics and Professional Responsibility;
  3. Federal Individual Income Taxation;
  4. Uniform Commercial Code Art. 1 &2 (but note that under the Contracts subject, the amendments include the UCC; as well as the new subject of Negotiable Instruments); and
  5. Wills, Estates and Trusts (but note that there is a new subject of Trusts and Estates).

The Examination:  Rule 6E(1) Essay Questions added the following subjects:

  1. Conflict of Laws;
  2. Federal Civil Procedure;
  3. Negotiable Instruments (Commercial Paper) under the UCC;
  4. Secured Transactions under the UCC; and
  5. Trusts and Estates.

The Examination:  Rule 6E(1) Essay Questions further stated what topics where covered under the following subjects:

  1. Business Associations – the subject no longer includes proprietorships;
  2. Contracts – the amendment stated the subject includes contracts under the UCC; and
  3. Trusts and Estates – the subject includes Decedents’ Estates, and Trusts and Future Interests

The Examination: Rule 6E(2) Multistate Performance Test stated there will be two 90-minute questions.  The prior rule stated one or two.

Admission Without Examination:  Rule 7A(C) Eligibility by UBE score was added to the ways an applicant may be admitted.  Rule 7A(C) states that the applicant might have received a certified scaled score of 260 or higher.  Rule 7A(C) also states the application must be completed within 36 months of the date of the examination.

Admission Without Examination:  Rule 7A(D) Transfer of MBE or UBE score was amended to add UBE.

Confidentiality and Release of Information:  Rule 14C(4) Examination of Data now includes the disclosure of the UBE.  In addition Rule 14C(5) specifies that the director may release copies of unsuccessful examinee’s answers to MEE and MPT questions.

via STATE OF MINNESOTA. (published by Minnesota Lawyer – subscription required).

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New Md. Law May Be First in Country Banning Employers From Seeking Workers’ Social Media Passwords

In what could be the first such law in the country, Maryland has enacted a bill that would prohibit employers from demanding personal passwords to social media sites such as Facebook from job applicants and workers.

State lawmakers last week almost unanimously approved making such information private, in response to reports that a growing number of employers are seeking access to individuals’ personal social media accounts to gather information for job-related decision-making, Raycom News Network reports.

The bill will take effect as law after it is signed into law by the state governor, the Gazette reports.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland favored the new measure. The state Chamber of Commerce opposed it.

While no one wants others to read private messages, the chamber had hoped lawmakers would recognize that there may be legitimate reason for employers to review social media sites, said lawyer and employment practitioner Elizabeth Torphy-Donzella of Shawe Rosenthal. Her Baltimore-based law firm represents the chamber.

Similar legislation is being pursued in California and Illinois and in Congress, the Baltimore Sun reports.

The Washington Post’s Capitol Business Blog says Michigan also is considering such a law.

via New Md. Law May Be First in Country Banning Employers From Seeking Workers’ Social Media Passwords – News – ABA Journal.

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Facebook and Job Applicants

Federal law clearly provides that employers must not discriminate against job applicants based on a number of factors, pursuant to Title VII, the ADA and ADAAA. What might employers find when they ask job applicants for their Facebook password?  Potentially sensitive information that could be used in a prohibitive manner when deciding who to hire – such as information regarding disabilities.

The following article was uploaded at EDD Blog:

Friday, Facebook threatened legal action against companies who require applicants provide usernames and passwords so prospective employers can see what applicants and their friends post on social networks. Now, it’s not clear what legal recourse Facebook has if businesses refuse to obey their demands, but shutting down the business’s Fan Page appears likely for violators. This action could cost firms tens of thousands or millions of dollars.

Erin Egan, Facebook’s Chief Privacy Officer had this to say about employers asking for applicant’s passwords:

“If you are a Facebook user, you should never have to share your password, let anyone access your account or do anything that might jeopardize the security of your account or violate the privacy of your friends,” Egan wrote. “We don’t think employers should be asking prospective employees to provide their passwords because we don’t think it’s the right thing to do.”

Facebook’s stance highlights the changing climate which causes clashes between individual privacy rights and corporate protection. And, without a strong social media policy, firms not only face possible legal action, but lose what is becoming a mandatory marketing channel.

via edd blog online: You Need A Social Media Policy.

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Legal Field Is Nation’s Most Difficult Industry for Job Placement

An employment website has more bad news for unemployed lawyers. Its data shows the legal field is the most difficult industry for job placement.

According to data from job search engine SimplyHired.com, there is less than one job opening for every 100 working lawyers, making it the career that is most difficult for job placement, the Wall Street Journal sub. req. reports.

The outlook is better for occupational, physical and speech therapists, who are in high demand and short supply, the story says. There are 64 open jobs in occupational therapy for every 100 people working in the field.According to a SimplyHired.com press release, job openings listed for the legal field dropped 1.9 percent in August.

Meanwhile, data from the Bureau of Legal Statistics shows the legal industry added only 100 new jobs in August, according to the Am Law Daily.

via Legal Field Is Nation’s Most Difficult Industry for Job Placement, Employment Website Says – News – ABA Journal.

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