Tag Archives: conduct

Judicial Ethics and Social Media

On February 21, 2013, the American Bar Association released a formal opinion (#462) regarding judicial ethics in the social media context.  The ABA concluded,

A judge may participate in electronic social networking, but as with all social relationships and contacts, a judge must comply with relevant provisions of the Code of Judicial Conduct and avoid any conduct that would undermine the judge’s independence, integrity, or impartiality, or create an appearance of impartiality.

So what does this mean?

Electronic Social Media and the Judicial Independence, impartiality, and integrity

The ABA recognized that social networking is a part of worldwide culture and that electronic social media interactions might be beneficial to judges in order to prevent them from being thought of as isolated or out of touch.

So how should judges then behave in this electronic environment?  Given the oath and importance of promoting public confidence in the independence, integrity, and impartiality,” the judge must be sensitive to the appearance of relationships with others.

It is important to understand that relations over the internet are difficult to manage because messages may be taken out of context, misinterpreted, or relayed incorrectly.

In other words, judges must assume that comments, images, or profile information, as well as any other information, might be publicly revealed without the judge’s permission.

In addition, judges should not form relationships with persons or organizations that might be violative of Judicial Ethics because these relationships convey that the individuals or organizations are in a position to influence the judge.

Furthermore, there might be disclosure or disqualification concerns regarding judges when the sites that were “friended” or “liked” which are used by lawyers or others who may appear before the judge.  The context is important here when assessing the judge’s relationship to attorneys or others who may appear before them.

Electronic Social Media and Election Campaigns

In the ABA Model Code (which may be adopted as a whole or in part by states), a judge or judicial candidate may engage in political or campaign activity with certain enumerated exceptions.

Of great importance is that judges and judicial candidates must “be free and appear to be free from political influence and political pressure.” ABA Model Rule 4.1 [1].

Similarly of equal importance, the judge or judicial candidate is prohibited from personally soliciting or accepting campaign contributions other than through a campaign committee.  ABA Model Rule 4.1(A)(8); see also ABA Model Rule 4.4.  In the Model Rules, the method of communication is not addressed or restricted.

In addition, judges and judicial candidates are prohibited from “publicly endorsing or opposing a candidate for any public office.” ABA Model Rule 4.1(A)(3).  This means that judges or judicial candidates should be aware that by “liking” or becoming a “fan” of, or by “sharing” messages, photos, or other content, this Model Rule might be violated.

In sum, judges and judicial candidates can use social media but must be aware of the potential pitfalls that might arise. These might arise from “friending,” “liking,” “sharing,” being a “fan” of, and posting comments, photos, or other information that might be distributed.  It is also important for judges and judicial candidates to be aware that any information on the Internet might be distributed by others and made public with or without their consent.

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NLRB charge alleging illegal picketing at Wal-Mart held in abeyance

The NLRB Office of General Counsel today announced that, based on specific commitments made by the United Food and Commercial Workers union, it is not necessary to decide the merits of an unfair labor practice charge filed by Wal-Mart against the UFCW.

In that charge, filed November 20, Wal-Mart alleged that the union violated the National Labor Relations Act by picketing at its stores for more than 30 days with the intent of seeking recognition for the union, without filing a petition for an election. The union, however, contended that the actions at the stores were not intended to gain union recognition, but to help employees in their efforts to have the employer commit to certain labor rights and standards.

The charge will be held in abeyance and dismissed in six months as long as the union complies with the commitments it has made. Under those commitments, described in an Advice Memorandum, the union disavowed any recognitional or organizational object and promised to maintain a disclaimer to that effect on Making Change for Wal-Mart and OUR Walmart websites. The union also promised, among other things, not to engage in any picketing or confrontational conduct which is the functional equivalent of picketing for 60 days.

via NLRB charge alleging illegal picketing at Wal-Mart held in abeyance | NLRB.

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Lawyer’s misconduct did not prevent class action certification

In a class action, lawyers’ conduct when contacting (or trying to contact) possible putative class members, is regulated by the court or federal statute.

In this case, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals determined  that class counsel’s faxing of unsolicited advertisement was misconduct.  The decision rested on the question of whether the law firm bribed a third-party in order to obtain a list of the possible putative class members.  Due to a lack of evidence that the payment of $5,000 was a bribe, the court allowed the class to be certified.

I raise this case because it raises the issue of attorney misconduct.  First of all, there are across-the-states ethics rules that govern attorneys’ conduct.  You can access ethics rules governing attorneys by going to the state court’s website and looking for the Board of Professional Responsibility or ethics rules.

As the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals highlighted multiple times, the law firm’s misconduct could possibly warrant disciplinary action.  The Court of Appeals commented that litigants and attorneys should report to the relevant bar authority (the Board of Professional Responsibility) instances of attorney misconduct.  Otherwise, the court warned, unpunished and inappropriate attorney conduct will continue.

In fact, there are ethical rules that discuss the reporting of misconduct.  In Minnesota, Rule 8.3 discusses the reporting of professional misconduct.  Rule 8.3 states, in relevant part,

(a) A lawyer who knows that another lawyer has committed a violation of the Rules of Professional Conduct that raises a substantial question as to that lawyer’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a lawyer in other respects, shall inform the appropriate professional authority.

Secondly, in a class action, the class representatives through their class counsel must show that the class counsel can appropriately represent the class.  In other words, the court must decide that the law firm can properly represent the entire class (which may in the hundredths).

So, if a law firm possibly engaged in misconduct, i.e. shows a lack of integrity – is the law firm’s representation proper?  The court did state that unethical conduct (regardless of whether it is prejudicial) raises “serious doubt” as to counsel’s ability to adequately represent the class.

via Courthouse News Service.

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