Tag Archives: controversy

Class action plaintiff can’t avoid federal court

The SCOTUS blog reports on Standard Fire Ins. Co. v. Knowles, 11-1450 (2013).  Here, the Supreme Court held that federal courts aren’t bound by plaintiffs in proposed class actions who try to keep cases in state court by stipulating to the amount in controversy.

The Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday in a unanimous opinion by Justice Stephen G. Breyer. Lead plaintiffs don’t have the authority to bind others prior to class certification and their stipulations don’t make “a critical difference,” Breyer said.

At issue were provisions in the Class Action Fairness Act giving federal courts original jurisdiction in class actions when the aggregated amount in controversy exceeds $5 million and there are more than 100 class members.

Lead plaintiff Greg Knowles had filed his suit in Miller County, Ark., and stipulated that the amount in controversy was less than $5 million. His would-be class action against Standard Fire Insurance Co. had alleged the insurer underpaid claims for hail damage. According to the complaint, “hundreds, and possibly thousands” of people in Arkansas had similar claims.

A federal court considering Knowles’ bid to send the case back to state court had found that the amount in controversy would have exceeded $5 million, absent the stipulation.

Breyer said Knowles’ stipulation does not remove the case from the scope of the federal class-action law. “The stipulation at issue here can tie Knowles’ hands, but it does not resolve the amount-in-controversy question in light of his inability to bind the rest of the class,” Breyer wrote. “For this reason, we believe the district court, when following the statute to aggregate the proposed class members’ claims, should have ignored that stipulation.”

via SCOTUS: Class action plaintiff can’t avoid federal court by stipulating to amount in controversy – ABA Journal.

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In Minnesota, Amendments to the Rules of Civil Procedure Highlight Proportionality

On February 4, 2013, the Supreme Court of the State of Minnesota adopted amendments to the Rules of Civil Procedure, including those affecting discovery.  Of particular note were amendments to Rules 1 and 26.  Specifically (and significantly), Rule 1 was amended to state that it is the responsibility of the parties and the court to assure proportionality throughout the litigation.  Accordingly, Rule 1 now states (new language is underlined):

These rules govern the procedure in the district courts of the State of Minnesota in all suits of a civil nature, with the exceptions stated in Rule 81.  They shall be construed and administered to secure the just, speedy, and inexpensive determination of every action.

It is the responsibility of the court and the parties to examine each civil action to assure that the process and the costs are proportionate to the amount in controversy and the complexity and importance of the issues.  The factors to be considered by the court in making a proportionality assessment include, without limitation: needs of the case, amount in controversy, parties’ resources, and complexity and importance of the issues at stake in the litigation.

Similarly, in addition to other significant amendments to Rule 26, Rule 26.02(b) has been amended to require that the scope of discovery “comport with the factors of proportionality, including without limitation, the burden or expense of the proposed discovery weighed against its likely benefit, considering the needs of the case, the amount in controversy, the parties’ resources, the importance of the issues at stake in the action, and the importance of the discovery in resolving the issues.”  While such limitations to discovery were previously acknowledged, the amended rule more strongly emphasizes the importance of proportionality.

Significant amendments to other rules were also adopted.  Notably, an order attaching “corrective amendments” was entered several days later.  Those orders are available HERE and HERE.  The newly adopted amendments become effective July 1, 2013.

via In Minnesota, Amendments to the Rules of Civil Procedure Highlight Proportionality : Electronic Discovery Law.

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