Tag Archives: definition

DOMA is unconstitutional

The Supreme Court opinion on United States v. Windsor, No. 12-307 (2013) held that DOMA was unconstitutional under the Fifth Amendment when it failed to recognize same-sex marriage federally.

It is important to note that the reasoning behind this ruling was based on the fact that there are States which granted same-sex marriage but were not recognized federally.  By failing to recognize those same-sex marriages, the government was discriminating against same-sex married couples.  In doing so, same-sex married couples were deprived of the benefits and responsibilities of over 1,000 federal laws.  Including protections under criminal law and provide financial harm to children of same-sex couples.

The Supreme Court noted that the State’s authority to regulate marriages was being squashed by the federal government.  Based on precedent, “[e]ach state as a sovereign has a rightful and legitimate concern in the marital status of persons domiciled within its borders.”  “The definition of marriage is the foundation of the State’s broader authority to regulate the subject of domestic relations with respect to the ‘[p]rotection of offspring, property interests, and the enforcement of marital responsibilities.'” (italics added).

Instead of respecting the State’s authority to regulate marriages, DOMA’s purpose was to “impose a disadvantage, a separate status, and so a sigma upon all who enter into same-sex marriages made lawful by the unquestioned authority of the States.”

Given that DOMA’s purpose was to impose restrictions and disabilities, the Supreme Court stated that “[b]y doing so [DOMA] violates basic due process and equal protection principles.”

The Supreme Court found that

DOMA’s principal effect is to identify a subset of state-sanctioned marriages and make them unequal.  The principal purpose is to impose inequality, not for other reasons like governmental efficiency….

DOMA contrives to deprive some couples married under the laws of their State, but not other couples, of both rights and responsibilities.  By creating two contradictory marriage regimes within the same State, DOMA forces same-sex couples to live as married for the purpose of state law but unmarried for the purpose of federal law, thus diminishing the stability and predictability of basic personal relations the State has found it proper to acknowledge and protect.

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under civil rights, courts, federal, legal decision, state, Supreme Court

ERISA: Is risk of relapse a disability?

This ERISA long-term disability case brings an interesting question.  Is an individual still disabled even though the disabling event has already passed – just because of the possible risk of relapse?  In other words, if person A had a disability event in 2000, is person A still considered disabled just because of what might or might happen in the future?

In Colby v. Union Sec. Ins. Co., 11-2270, the First Circuit Court of Appeals decided just that.  In this case, the issue was whether the future risk of relapse by an anesthesiologist who had been diagnosed with addition rendered the anesthesiologist disabled for purposes of a long-term disability policy.

The First Circuit Court of Appeals decided this case based on the language of the policy.  Under the policy language, covered “sickness” including mental health issues, including substance abuse, dependence, and addiction.  While in treatment, plaintiff’s doctors consistently held that the risk of relapse was “high” and recommended plaintiff not return to work for a period of 6 months.  Shortly thereafter, plaintiff relapsed.  After the relapse and due to the continuing high risk of relapse, plaintiff’s doctors agreed plaintiff should remain disabled for some period of time after plaintiff’s discharge.

This case arose because the the insurance company maintained that the risk of relapse (regardless of the degree) did not constitute as a disability under the plan.

After looking at the policy language, the First Circuit Court of Appeals disagreed.  There was nothing in the policy that stated that risk of relapse should not be covered as a disability.  The court stated,

To begin, the language of the plan admits of no such categorial bar.  It does not mention risk of relapse, let alone exclude risk of relapse as a potential basis for a finding of disability.

In the words of the Boston ERISA Law Blog:

So there you have it: if you don’t want to cover the currently rehabilitated participant whose risk of relapse means he can’t go back to work, you better write that down somewhere in the plan or the policy.

via Is the Risk of Relapse a Disabling Condition for Purposes of an LTD Policy? : Boston ERISA Law Blog.

Leave a comment

Filed under ERISA, legal decision

DOMA and Prop 8 goes to Court

On Friday, the Supreme Court agreed to hear two cases regarding the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and California’s Prop 8.

In Hollingsworth v. Perry (docket 12-144), the issue os whether Proposition 8 from California is constitutional.  These are the highlights and arguments in this case.

In United States v. Windsor (docket 12-307), the issue is whether the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) is constitutional as it relates by providing that the definition of marriage means only a union between a man and a woman.

via Evening round-up : SCOTUSblog.

Leave a comment

Filed under civil rights, courts, Supreme Court

Case to watch re: supervisor liability

Ball v. Vance is the name of the case.

Issue: Whether the “supervisor” liability rule established by Faragher v. City of Boca Raton and Burlington Industries, Inc. v. Ellerth (i) applies to harassment by those whom the employer vests with authority to direct and oversee their victim’s daily work, or (ii) is limited to those harassers who have the power to “hire, fire, demote, promote, transfer, or discipline” their victim.

via Adjunct Law Prof Blog: Supremes Grant Cert In Case Involving Faragher Affirmative Defense.

Leave a comment

Filed under civil rights, employment