Tag Archives: economy

Law Schools Cuts

The ABA Journal reporting on an interesting trend.  Law Schools are trying to deal with the current economic situation and the decline of law school applicants.

The Wall Street Journal  (subscription required) reports that LSAC’s (Law School Admission Council) most recent data shows that as of July 5th, applications for the entering class of 2013 fell by 36% compared to the entering class in 2010.

These faculty cuts are noted in the article:

  • Hamline University School of Law in St. Paul, Minn., has cut full-time faculty about 18 percent since 2010. Fourteen faculty members have left or plan to leave after accepting early retirement incentives.
  • Eight professors at Vermont Law School have agreed to retire early, take pay cuts or give up tenure.
  • Twenty-one professors accepted buyout packages at Widener University School of Law in Wilmington, Del., and Harrisburg, Pa.
  • Seven professors accepted early retirement packages from the University of Dayton School of Law.
  • Seven untenured professors at Seton Hall University School of Law in Newark, N.J., have received notice that their contracts might not be renewed for the 2014-15 academic year.
  • The University of the Pacifics McGeorge School of Law in Sacramento, Calif., is accelerating plans to cut the size of the law school and use some of its campus for other graduate-level classes.

via Law schools cope with declining enrollment by quietly cutting faculty – ABA Journal.

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Economic state – a close up examination

So what is the employment state of the US right now?  You would be surprised at what the numbers really mean.

On Friday March 8th the Bureau of Labor Statistics released the most anticipated report of the employment situation.  The report found:

  • Unemployment decreased to 7.7% in February.  The number of unemployed persons also edged lower in February to 12 million.
  • Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 236,000 in February.

So does this mean that the economy state keeps booming every month?  Not really.

It is important to look at a very important report, which is usually clouded: The Job Openings and Labor Turnover.

Why is this report so important?  For one, it shows the population’s confidence on whether they would find other employment if they quit their current job.  Second, it really shows a clear picture of how many people lost their job.  So hypothetically, if the US lost 1 million jobs, but only gained 500,000 – this doesn’t bode very well for the economy.

On Tuesday March 12th, the Bureau of Labor Statistics released the Job  Openings and Labor Turnover.  This report found:

Jon Openings

  • The number of job openings (3.7 million) did not change much from December.
  • The number of openings rose in professional and business services.
  • However, it decreased in health care and social assistance.
  • All remaining industries did not change much from January.

Hires Rate

  • The hires rate (3.1%) changed little from January.  The hires rate was not seasonally adjusted.
  • The hires rate decreased in mining and logging and in the arts, entertainment, and recreation.
  • The hires rate was unchanged for total nonfarm, private, and government.

Separation Rate

  • The separation rate includes: (1) quits; (2) layoffs; and (3) discharges.  The overall separations rate (3%) changed little from January.
  • The overall quits rate was unchanged at 1.6%.  The quits rate was not seasonally adjusted.
  • The quits rate edged up for total private in January.
  • The quits rate for government was unchanged.
  • The layoffs and discharges rate was seasonally adjusted.  The layoffs and discharges rate changed little from January at 1.1%.

So what does these statistics show?  For one, that the overall rate of job openings has not really changed.  Similarly, the overall rate of separation rate has not really changed.

Most interesting is the fact that upon close examination – the where of these job openings has changed.

In the health care and social assistance industries, the rate of job openings have decreased.  The question posed is – will this affect the services accessibility to the public?

The education and health services rate was 3.1% (January 2012), 3.2% (December 2012), and 2.8% (January 2013).  Since December 2012 to January 2013, we are seeing a 0.4% decrease.

The health care and assistance rate was 3.4% (January 2012), 3.4% (December 2012), and 3.0% (January 2013).  From December 2012 to January 2013, we also saw a 0.4% decrease.

On the more positive side, the job openings rate increased in the professional and business services, as well as in construction.

The construction industry rate has been slowly increasing. The rate is 1.4% (January 2012), 1.6% (December 2012), and 1.7% (January 2013).

The professional and business services also show a very promising increase.  In other words, we are almost back to January 2012 rates.  The rate is 3.7% (January 2012), 3.1% (December 2012), and 3.6% (January 2013).  This means that we have seen a jump of 0.5%, which puts at near the rate of January 2012.

 

via Job Openings and Labor Turnover Summary.

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VA Can’t Refuse To Treat Medical Conditions Of Inmates

The District Court for the Western District of Virginia refused to dismiss a class action alleging that a womens prison in Virginia fails to treat medical conditions as a way to cut costs.

Five prisoners at Fluvanna Correction Center for Women FCCW in Troy, Va., are leading the charge against the Virginia Department of Corrections VDOC, which they say routinely violates Eighth Amendment rights and shows deliberate indifference to medical needs.

U.S. District Judge Norman Moon denied the states motion to dismiss Tuesday.

“Plaintiffs allege that, as a result of cost-saving concerns, medical personnel at FCCW have failed, or refused, to invest the time or effort required to acknowledge, examine, diagnose and treat them with respect to existing or potentially serious medical problems and concerns,” he wrote. “Indeed, the complaint is replete with specific examples of how Plaintiffs have been adversely affected as a result of this concern.”

The decision states that officials with the Virginia Department of Corrections allegedly received hundreds of grievances, which should have notified them of a continuing problem at the prison facility.  Consequently, Judge Moon held that the class may proceed.

“Given that plaintiffs have alleged that the VDOC defendants remained inactive despite personal knowledge of information disclosing alleged ongoing deficiencies in medical care, plaintiffs Eighth Amendment claim may proceed against them directly.”

The complaint alleges the prison refused to treat medical conditions in the following examples of the putative class representatives.

  • The prison failed to give the proper dosage of medication prescribed to Cynthia Scott after she was diagnosed with sarcoidosis, a disease that formed nodules in her lungs, spleen and liver. Scott also allegedly developed a blood clot in her leg that was left untreated until it traveled to her lungs.
  • Bobinette Fearce, a second named plaintiff, says she has degenerative disc disease, causing her chronic pain. The prison doctors allegedly refused to give her enough Tylenol to alleviate her pain. She also claims to suffer from incontinence and must wear a diaper at all times, but an FCCW doctor said she is “too old to be afforded the surgery that would correct her bladder condition.”
  • Patricia Knight says that a stroke caused her to lose grip strength and made walking difficult. Because her conditions allegedly prevent her from performing any prison job, Knight says she cannot afford the $5 “co-pay” for prison medical visits and therefore gets little medical care.
  • Marguerite Richardson says she visited the medical staff when she developed a number of boils on her leg. A test found that she had a highly contagious antibiotic-resistant infection, but the prison waited five months to give her medication to treat the infection, the complaint states.
  • Rebecca Scott, the fifth plaintiff, allegedly suffers from recurring tonsillitis. She says an FCCW doctor told her he “does not believe in removal of tonsils by surgery,” that the prison has rejected her requests to see an outside specialist.

via Courthouse News Service.

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