Tag Archives: iPhone

E-Mails and NRLB: Do Employees Have Rights?

On April 30, 2014, the NLRB announced that it is considering overturning Register Guard, 351 NLRB 110 (2007), enfd. in relevant part and remanded sub nom, Guard Publishing v. NLRB, 571 F.3d 53 (D.C. Cir. 2009).

The issue resolves around the current existing law that states:

Employees have no statutory right to use the[ir] Employer’s e-mail system for Section 7 purposes.

The NLRB is requesting amici briefs that address the following questions:

  1. Should the Board reconsider the conclusion in Register Guard that employees do not have a statutory right to use their employer’s email system (or other electronic communication systems) for Section 7 purposes?
  2. If the Board overrules Register Guard, what standard(s) of employee access to the employer’s electronic communication systems should be established? What restrictions, if any, may an employer place on such access, and what factors are relevant to such restrictions?
  3. In deciding the above questions, to what extent and how should the impact on the employer of employees’ use of an employer’s electronic communications technology affect the issue?
  4. Do employee personal electronic devices (e.g., phones, tablets), social media accounts, and/or personal email accounts affect the proper balance to the be struck between employers’ rights and employees’ Section 7 rights to communicate about work-related matters? If so, how?
  5. Identify any other technological issues concerning email or other electronic communication systems that the Board should reconsider in answering the foregoing questions, including any relevant changes that may have occurred in electronic communications technology since Register Guard was decided. How should these affect the Board’s decision?

 

The briefs are due on or before June 16, 2014 and cannot exceed 25 pages.

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Filed under attorneys, briefs, civil rights, electronic discovery, employment, federal, labor, legal decision, NLRA, NLRB, rules, Section 7, union

Mobile Data Privacy Laws Misunderstood by Users

Smartphone users understanding of privacy laws may not be accurate, according to a recent survey by law researchers from the University of California at Berkeley. The survey considered data from 1,200 users telephoned on either a landline or a mobile phone and sought to gain insight on perceptions about privacy as it relates to data stored on mobile devices. Researchers found that over 80 percent of users surveyed believed that their mobile phone was as private at their personal computer. Further, 70 percent of users would not want their cell phone provider to use location-based data to target ads to them, nor would they wish for social networking apps to use their contact lists.

As discussed by Technology Review, most smartphone users surveyed were seemingly unaware that, during an arrest, courts have allowed the search of a cellphone just as if it were any other possession. Regarding the use of location-based data for targeted advertisement, many apps already collect location data, sometimes with the users unknowing permission, hastily and inadvertently given when accepting the conditions of a free app.

But for midsize businesses, it is the collection of users contact lists that is perhaps most troubling. Businesses have privacy policies to protect customer information, but rightly or wrongly, it is a common enough practice in industry for employees to store customer phone numbers and other sensitive information on business and sometimes even personal cellphones. A recent article in Todays iPhone says that a recent Bitdefender study of 65,000 apps showed that 18.6% access cellphone users contact list information, and only 57.5% of those apps go on to encrypt the captured data. Although the release of iOS 6 will warn users when an app wants to collect data, it is still a troubling statistic.

via Midsize Insider: Mobile Data Privacy Laws Misunderstood by Users.

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Filed under electronic discovery, Privacy Rights