Tag Archives: license

Court upholds Handgun-Sales Age Requirement

This case again shows that regulating firearms is constitutional.

In NRA v. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, 11-10959 (5th Cir. Apr. 29, 2013), the court upheld 18 USC 922(b)(1) and (c)(1).  These laws prohibit federally licensed firearms dealers from selling handguns under the age of 21.

The NRA claimed that this federal statute was unconstitutional under the Second Amendment.  The court disagreed.

The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals explained:

In a critical passafe, moreover, the Court emphasized that the ‘right secured by the Second Amendment is not unlimited.’ [Dist. of Columbia v. Heller, 554 US 570, at 626].  As the [Supreme] Court explained:

From Blackstone through the 19th-century cases, commentators and courts routinely explained that the right was not a right to keep and carry any weapon whatsoever in any manner whatsoever and for whatever purpose… [N]othing in our opinion should be taken to cast doubt on longstanding prohibitions on the possession of firearms by felons and the mentally ills, or laws forbidding the carrying of firearms in sensitive places such as schools and government buildings, or laws imposing conditions and qualifications on the commercial sale of arms.

Id. at 626-27 (emphasis added) (citations omitted).

Thus, the Circuit Court stated that “Congress designed its scheme to solve a particular problem: violent crimes associated with the trafficking of handguns from federal firearms to licensees to young adults.”  The court, further stated that Congress could have sought to prohibit all persons under 21 from possessing handguns or all guns.  Additionally, the court pointed that under the Census, 18-to-20-year-olds accounted for a disproportionately high percentage of arrests for violent crimes” in 2010.

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Wireless networks and the FCC

The Federal Communication Commission has proposed the creation of the Advanced Wireless Services (AWS) H Block, which would extend the Personal Communications Services (PCS) band by 10 megahertz, for flexible use. The PCS is heavily used by Verizon, Sprint, AT&T and T-Mobile, the nations big four providers, as well as their rural counterparts.

The additional spectrum is meant to help maintain the speed and capacity of the nations wireless networks amid the unprecedented demand for mobile service.

If approved, the new rule would mark the FCCs first step in implementing a Congressional directive in the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012, more widely known as the “payroll tax cut.”  The act calls for an establishment of a national public safety broadband network, which will expand high-speed wireless broadband and give better access to first responders, such as fire and police, in an emergency.

“Wireless broadband is a key component of economic growth, job creation and global competitiveness because consumers are increasingly using wireless broadband services to assist them in their everyday lives,” the FCC said in its bandwidth proposal.

The FCC plans to grant new initial licenses for the 1915-1920 MHz and 1995-2000 MHz bands, known as the lower H block and the upper H block, respectively. A system of competitive bidding will determine who is granted the commercial use licenses.

The plan to extend the bandwidth includes licensing the H block as paired five-megahertz blocks, with the upper block used for high-power base stations and the lower block for mobile and low power fixed operations. The licensing will also be based on a geographic and economic area scheme.

“We seek to adopt a service area size for the H Block that meets several statutory goals,” the FCC said in its bandwidth proposal. “These include facilitating access to spectrum by both small and large providers, providing for the efficient use of the spectrum, encouraging deployment of wireless broadband services to consumers, especially those in rural areas, and promoting investment in and rapid deployment of new technologies and services consistent with our obligations under section 309j of the Communications Act.”

via Courthouse News Service.

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