Tag Archives: rate

Associate attorney is the unhappiest job in America

ABA Journal reports on a Forbes story, which lists Associate Attorneys as the unhappiest at their job.  Legal Assistants make it to number 7 on the list.  The list was compiled by CareerBliss.

Heidi Golledge, chief executive of CareerBliss, told Forbes why associates are so unhappy. “In many cases, law firms are conducted in a structured environment that is heavily centered on billable hours. It may take several years for an associate attorney to rise to the rank of partner,” Golledge said. “People in this position rated the way they work and the rewards they receive lower than any other industry.”

CareerBliss based its list on reviews completed by more than 65,000 employees last year. The employees rated key factors that affect happiness on the job, including work-life balance, relationships with bosses and co-workers, work environment, job resources, compensation, growth opportunities, company culture, company reputation, daily tasks and control over daily work.

The top unhappiest jobs are:

  1. Associate attorney
  2. Customer service associate
  3. Clerk
  4. Registered nurse
  5. Teacher
  6. Marketing Coordinator
  7. Legal Assistant
  8. Pharmacy Technician
  9. Technical Support Specialist
  10. Case Manager

via Associate attorney is the unhappiest job in America, survey says – ABA Journal.

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Filed under attorneys, employment, law students

Economic state – a close up examination

So what is the employment state of the US right now?  You would be surprised at what the numbers really mean.

On Friday March 8th the Bureau of Labor Statistics released the most anticipated report of the employment situation.  The report found:

  • Unemployment decreased to 7.7% in February.  The number of unemployed persons also edged lower in February to 12 million.
  • Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 236,000 in February.

So does this mean that the economy state keeps booming every month?  Not really.

It is important to look at a very important report, which is usually clouded: The Job Openings and Labor Turnover.

Why is this report so important?  For one, it shows the population’s confidence on whether they would find other employment if they quit their current job.  Second, it really shows a clear picture of how many people lost their job.  So hypothetically, if the US lost 1 million jobs, but only gained 500,000 – this doesn’t bode very well for the economy.

On Tuesday March 12th, the Bureau of Labor Statistics released the Job  Openings and Labor Turnover.  This report found:

Jon Openings

  • The number of job openings (3.7 million) did not change much from December.
  • The number of openings rose in professional and business services.
  • However, it decreased in health care and social assistance.
  • All remaining industries did not change much from January.

Hires Rate

  • The hires rate (3.1%) changed little from January.  The hires rate was not seasonally adjusted.
  • The hires rate decreased in mining and logging and in the arts, entertainment, and recreation.
  • The hires rate was unchanged for total nonfarm, private, and government.

Separation Rate

  • The separation rate includes: (1) quits; (2) layoffs; and (3) discharges.  The overall separations rate (3%) changed little from January.
  • The overall quits rate was unchanged at 1.6%.  The quits rate was not seasonally adjusted.
  • The quits rate edged up for total private in January.
  • The quits rate for government was unchanged.
  • The layoffs and discharges rate was seasonally adjusted.  The layoffs and discharges rate changed little from January at 1.1%.

So what does these statistics show?  For one, that the overall rate of job openings has not really changed.  Similarly, the overall rate of separation rate has not really changed.

Most interesting is the fact that upon close examination – the where of these job openings has changed.

In the health care and social assistance industries, the rate of job openings have decreased.  The question posed is – will this affect the services accessibility to the public?

The education and health services rate was 3.1% (January 2012), 3.2% (December 2012), and 2.8% (January 2013).  Since December 2012 to January 2013, we are seeing a 0.4% decrease.

The health care and assistance rate was 3.4% (January 2012), 3.4% (December 2012), and 3.0% (January 2013).  From December 2012 to January 2013, we also saw a 0.4% decrease.

On the more positive side, the job openings rate increased in the professional and business services, as well as in construction.

The construction industry rate has been slowly increasing. The rate is 1.4% (January 2012), 1.6% (December 2012), and 1.7% (January 2013).

The professional and business services also show a very promising increase.  In other words, we are almost back to January 2012 rates.  The rate is 3.7% (January 2012), 3.1% (December 2012), and 3.6% (January 2013).  This means that we have seen a jump of 0.5%, which puts at near the rate of January 2012.

 

via Job Openings and Labor Turnover Summary.

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Filed under employment, labor

Lower pay for related care givers struck down

Minnesota Lawyer (Dec. 24, 2012, subscription required) has an interested article regarding Minn. Stat. 256B.0659 (2011).  In 2011, the Minnesota legislature passed a bill stating that non relative personal care attendants were to receive a pay rate of 80% of the non relative pay.  In other words, relative personal care attendants would receive a 30% pay cut.  In Healthstar v. Home Health, Inc. v. Jesson, the Court of Appeals reversed the Ramsey District Court decision.  The court struck down the statute.

The court held that the statute did not meet the prong of showing that the bill was not manifestly arbitrary of fanciful, but that it must be genuine and substantial.  The court stated that the commissioner’s argument was “based on an assumption that relative PCAs will continue to provide care even if affected by a pay cut.”

The court further stated that “the rationale for the distinction advanced by respondent is based purely on assumptions rather than facts, including the apparently unchallenged assumption that a moral obligation to provide care for a relative necessarily equates to a moral obligation to personally provide such care at a lower rate of pay than a nonrelative PCA would receive for the same work.”

The Court of Appeals also held that the statute did not meet the prong that the classification must be genuine or relevant to the purpose of the law.  The court stated that the commissioner did not show any facts in support of its assumption.

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Filed under Appellate, Uncategorized

Unionization Rates Continue to Decline

On January 23, 2013, the BLS released its annual report on the rate of unionization. Overall, the rate of unionization feel from 11.8% to 11.3%. Public sector workers had a 35.8 percent membership rate while the rate on unionization in the private sector dropped to 6.6%.

Significantly, however, union members continue to earn more than there non-union counterparts. As the report states:

In 2012, among full-time wage and salary workers, union members had median usual weekly earnings of $943, while those who were not union members had median weekly earnings of $742.

In addition to coverage by a collective bargaining agreement, this earnings difference reflects a variety of influences, including variations in the distribution sof union members and nonunion employees by occupation, industry, firm size, or geographic region.

via Adjunct Law Prof Blog: Breaking News. Unionization Rates Continue to Decline.

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Filed under labor, union, wage